Ballyshannon

Artist(s) : Thomas Creswick (Draughtsman), Samuel Fisher (Engraver)

View of Ballyshannon from the opposite bank of the River Erne. Diverse rural activities are suggested by a top-hatted man with a rifle and two dogs, on the left, and a woman, accompanied by another woman and a child, balancing a load on her head. Three further figures are grouped near houses further back, on the left bank of the river. The banks of the river are linked by a multi-arched bridge, with tall buildings on either side. To the right the ground rises steeply, with a church prominently situated above the town. There are cattle by the water and, beyond the bridge, sail boats and ships.

Inscribed in Image

  • Signature – T. Creswick. / S. Fisher.
  • Caption outside of boundaries of image – Ballyshannon County Donegal.
  • Text outside of boundaries of image – London, Published for the Proprietor, by Longman & Co. Paternoster Row.

Image Details

Genre Townscape
Technique Etchings
Subject(s) Architecture, Cities and towns, Nature, Rural life
Geographical Location
  • Ballyshannon - Town or city
  • Donegal - County
  • Ulster - Province
Keywords(s) Boats, Bridges, Children, Churches, Dogs, Firearms, Hats, Hunting, Livestock, Mountains, Peasants, People, Rivers, Ships, Trees, Wetlands, Women
Colour Monochrome
Dimensions 10.4 cm x 12.4 cm
Published / created 1838

Bibliographical Details

Travel Account Ireland Picturesque and Romantic
Contributor(s)
Print or manuscript Print
Location of image in copy Vol. II, facing p. 163
Source copy National Library of Ireland Ir 9141 r 15
Alternative source

This is a link to a digital copy hosted by an external website.

http://hdl.handle.net/2027/yale.39002001929083?urlappend=%3Bseq=194
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Rights Courtesy of the National Library of Ireland

Related text from travel account

Ballyshannon appeared a dozen miles off, the space between resembling a vast plain: but this was an optical illusion of a very common kind; for, on descending into the plain, it changed into a series of low hills, on one of which the town stood. To the right were numerous sand-hills, and extensive tracts of sand stretching along the sea.
Of Ballyshannon I have nothing to say; but Mr. Creswick, the reader will perceive, is eloquent on the subject. Except in point of situation, in fact, the town is altogether uninteresting: and, although its salmon fisheries are important, we had enough of that sport at Coleraine. [Vol. II, p. 163]
Ballyshannon