[Sepulchral Monument of Richard de Clare, Earl of Pembroke]

Artist(s) : Thomas Dineley (Draughtsman)

Sepia and red ink sketch of the (supposed) sepulchral monuments of Richard de Clare, Earl of Pembroke, and of his son, in Christ Church Cathedral, Dublin. An effigy rests upon the rectangular tomb, in full armour, with sword and shield, hands joined in prayer. Beside this, upon a second monument, there is a half-length figure, with head and torso only.
Traditionally the two figures have been taken to represent Richard de Clare, known as Strongbow, and his son. However, according to expert opinion, based mainly on the armorial bearings on the shield, the effigy of the knight in armour is a replacement for the original. There is no certainty about who lies within the two sarcophagi.
Source:
Edward Roe Seymour, Christ Church Cathedral, Dublin (Dublin: Hodges, Foster & Co., 1869), pp. 42-45.

Image Details

Genre Scientific or Technical illustration
Technique Pen and ink drawings
Subject(s) Antiquities and archaeological sites
Geographical Location
  • Christ Church Cathedral, Dublin - Named locality
  • Dublin - Town or city - dublin
  • Dublin - County
  • Leinster - Province
Keywords(s) Archaeological sites, Armour, Daggers & swords, Men, People, Prayer, Sculpture, Shields, Soldiers, Tombs & sepulchral monuments
Colour Handcoloured
Dimensions 8.9 cm x 6.3 cm
Published / created 1681

Bibliographical Details

Travel Account Observations in a Voyage through the Kingdom of Ireland
Contributor(s)
Print or manuscript Manuscript
Location of image in copy p. 28
Source copy National Library of Ireland MS 392
Permalink
Rights Courtesy of the National Library of Ireland

Related text from travel account

The next monument to be considered is that of Richardus de Clare, Earle of Pembroke and Strigill sirnamed Strongbowe whose name is used in this citty upon the same occasion as was that of Duke Humphrey buried in St Pauls London, where people in distress used to walk when they were at loss how to compass a dinner, and were by a by word sd to have din’d with Duke Humphrey: so here whoever misseth of his dinner is sayd to have dined with Strong Bowe.
Strongbowe als Strangbowe was sent over by Henry the second in the yeer M C LXXIII Lord Justice of Ireland, after having bin the first and principall invader thereof Anno Dni M C LX IX as appeares by Inscripco which is to be seen in Christes Church whose monument I have sketcht off on the other side this leafe, with the sayd Inscripco He died AN. DOM. M C LXX VI His sons monument [p. 28] cutt off in the middle is also seen by it. This execucon was sayd to be done upon his son by Strongbowes own hand, because he flinched in the Battaile as appeared, by the Inscripcon of auncienter date than this, in Latine. [image of engraved inscription]
THIS ANCIENT MONUMENT OF RICHARD STRANG
BOWE CALLED COMES STRANGULENSIS LORD OF
CHEPSTOW AND OGNY THE FIRST AND PRINCIPALL
INVADER OF IRELAND 1169 QUI OBIIT 1177
THE MONUMENT WAS BROKEN BY THE FALLE OF
THE ROOF AND BODY OF CHRISTES CHURCH IN ANO
1560 AND SETT UP AGAYNE AT THE CHARGE OF
THE RIGHT HONOURABLE SIR HENRY SYDNEY KNYGHT
OF THE NOBLE ORDER, PRESIDENT OF WALES
LORD DEPUTY OF IRELAND, 1570.
According to York ye Blacksmith page 240 the coat differs from that on ye sheild and The Arms of Strongbow [image of shield] viz. [image of motto] are thus or 3 Cheverons Gules a Label of 5 Azure.
It is sayd of him that standing upright, he was able with the palms of his hands to cap his knees which shewed a prodigious long reach, and strength with all for drawing of the long bow. He died at Kilkenny A.D. 1177. Mr Vincent sayth page 412 that his son who led some forces agst ye Irish, and loosing the feild his Father slew him.
This Strongbowe founded the ancient Priory of Kilmainham about half a mile out of Towne Ao Dni MCLXXIV whose endowing King Henry e second confirmed.
Strongbowes other Titles were \besides/ Lord of Chepstowe, Count of Ogny in Normandy Earle of Liecester, Earle [p. 29] Marshall of England, Vicegerent of Normandy, Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, Prince of the Province of Leinster in the right of Eva his wife sole daughter & heiresse of Dermot Mac Morogh King of Leinster: \by whom he had a daughter named Isabel -/
This last Monument of Strongbowe is thought to be onely a Cenotaph or Honorary tomb, erected Honoris vel memoriae gratia such as the souldiers made to the memory of Drusus upon the river Rhine, when his body was carried to Rome & interr’d in Campo Martio. [pp. 27-29]
[Further remark on his supposed burial in Kilkenny, p. 30.]
Sepulchral Monument of Richard de Clare, Earl of Pembroke