[University of Dublin]

Artist(s) : Thomas Dineley (Draughtsman)

Bird’s eye view of Trinity College Dublin with letters indicating notable buildings and inscriptions. A group of people in the open area in front of the entrance and outer walls is constituted of a fragment of printed plate pasted upon the drawing. A fence along the bottom of the image defines the west side of College Green. Just above the view of the University is a sketch of the coat of arms of Queen Elizabeth I. No key is provided for the letters in the image, but some are explained in the text: C (inscription in memory of Henry Jones), S (doors to the first court and inscription in memory of George Carey), T (chapel door with inscription commemorating William Fitz William).

Inscribed in Image

  • Text within boundaries of image –
    A / B / F / G / C / H / S / D / S / E

Image Details

Genre Scientific or Technical illustration
Technique Collages, Engravings, Pen and ink drawings
Subject(s) Architecture
Geographical Location
  • Trinity College, Dublin - Named locality
  • Dublin - Town or city
  • Dublin - County
  • Leinster - Province
Keywords(s) Buildings, Crowds, Emblems, Flags, Gates, Heraldic devices, People, Steeples, Towers, Universities & colleges
Colour Monochrome
Dimensions 16 cm x 8.5 cm
Published / created 1681

Bibliographical Details

Travel Account Observations in a Voyage through the Kingdom of Ireland
Contributor(s)
Print or manuscript Manuscript
Location of image in copy p. 71
Source copy National Library of Ireland MS 392
Permalink
Rights Courtesy of the National Library of Ireland

Related text from travel account

The flourishing University of Dublin was first granted to this city by Pope John 22, anno Dni MCCCXX, at the request of Alexander Bicknor als Bignor Archbipp of Dublin. But put into the state it is, by Her Highness Queen Elizabeth of ever blessed memory, In the yeer MDLXXXXI, who then founded a Colledge in the time that Sr William Fitz William was Lord Deputy of this Kingdome, Upon a Place which was heretofore called the Monastery of All Saints. The Colledge is now dedicated to the Holy and individuall Trinity, under this Title, Collegium Sanctae ac individuae Trinitatis ex Fundatione Reginae Elizabethae juxta Dublin, who enriched and bestowed upon it all the Priviledges of an University, since which time Sr Willia Fitz Williams Arms are not onely seen over ye colledge gate, but its chappel gate also.
Its Chancellours were
Ist Sr William Cecill, Knt Baron Burleigh Lord High Treasurer of England one of his Maties most Honble Privy Council and Knight of the most noble Order of the Garter.
IInd Robert Devoreux Earle of Essex Earle Marshall of England Lord Lieutenant of the Kingdome of Irelad, and Chancellour not only of this but of the famous University of Cambridge in England; he came over with full power to make warr or peace, to pardon any offence of Treason or anything against Q. Elizabeth even Tir-Oen himself, so that being furnished with 16000 foot and 1300 Horse accompanyed with ye Prime youth of the nobles and Gentry of England, he came into this Kingdome, but did little and return'd in her Maties displeasure & Anno 1601 feb. 25 was beheaded within ye Tower.
In the Reigne of King Charles the Martyr Doctor Willia LAUD Arch Bishop of Canterbury was Chancellour both of [p. 65] the most famous University of Oxford & of Dublin.
Then succeeded him His Excellency James Marquis of Ormond Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, since made Duke and Chancellour of the University of Dublin now likewise of the most Famous University of Oxford.
This University hath a
COLLEDG of PHYSITIANS who enjoy many and considerable Priviledges from his most sacred Matie Charles the second.
The Glory of the University Library was ecclipsed much after that inhumane and most horrid Rebellion wch happened Ao Dni MDLXXXXVIII. When Sr Thomas Bodeley is sayd to have purchased some of the books and translated them from that of Dublin to his incomparable Library of Oxford, which is thought by Travellers not to give place to that in the Vatican.
Benefactors to the Library of Dublin were the *Officers of the Army who gave money to be layd out in Books in England *since which time any Officers son is admitted gratis provided he is not worth 20L p[er] anum by Mr Challoner and Mr Usher his son in law afterwards Lord Primate, Henry Cromwell and Sr Jerome Alexander a justice in ye coon Pleas here who bequeathed his own Library as well of Law books as others with an hundred pounds to sett it up. Also 500L to be layd out in additionall Building to the Colledge, and 24L p. ann Fee simple, to be disposed of as see page.
Belonging to this University to be considered by the Travellr is a fair
LIBRARY wherein amongst other choice manuscripts, rarities and Antiquities, as Medalls Coynes Roman Urnes &c is seen the Library of the late Rt Reverend Bishop Usher consisting of the best & choicest books extant. This guift was by Henry Cromwell, made by his Father the late Usurper in the yeer 1655 Lord Lieutt of Ireland, a person who openly shew'd himself against the anabaptists then rageing; And countenancing this University then in a low ebb, bestowing the sd admirable Library of Bipp Usher thereon, carrying himself so as some of the rigour of his Father was thereby taken off.
The GOVERNMENT of this University Is by a Chancellour Vice Chancellor, Provost, Vice-Provost Proctor Senior, Proproctor &c. The Present Chancellour is his Grace the Duke [p. 66] of Ormond.
The present Vice chancellour is Michael Boyle Ld Chancellour and Primate of all Ireland
The present Provost is Dr Marsh of Oxford.
The Vice Provost is.
The Vice Provost, Senior Proctor, Proproctor, Senior Deane Senior Lecturer, Burser, Divinity Professor, who also have a share in the Gouvernment of this University, are elected yeerly out of the seven senior fellowes, the 9 Junior fellows are not left out of the Government
The SCHOLLARS are in number seventy which with students at this time make up in all above two hundred and fifty.
In conferring Degrees respect is had to standing
Batchelours at four years.
Masters at seven years
Batchelours of Divinity at 15 yeers, Doctor at twenty yeers.
They cap to all University Officers Fellows junior & senir Fellow commoners \cap to none/ but the Provost and upwards.
The first Scholler was the late most Reverend Father in God Archbipp Usher who prophesied the Rebellion which happened in Ireland in the reigne of the late King of blessed memory the 23 October 1641, 40 years before it happened; *Archbishop Usher preaching soon after the overthrow of the Spanyards at Kinsale 1601, on the vision of Ezek chap 4. vers 6, he drew a fitt applicacon. This bloody Rebellion brake out 23 octob. 1641, St Ignatius Loiola's birth day, that less than such a Patron might not be intituled to so close and bloody a designe. In this the Rebells pretend a Commission under the Kings broad seale, occasioned by one Plunkets having taken an old Broad seale from an obsolete out of date Pattent out of Farnham Abby and fixed it to a forged Commission which served to seduce the vulgar and Irish rabble into an opinion of their Loyaltie. [p. 67]
The aforemenconed Judge of the comon Pleas Sr. Jerome Alexander, besides his own Library, 100L in money, 500L more in decoration of the Colledge, gave the Fee simple of 24 t s p an[num] to these Uses, 7L per annu addition to the Library Keeper 20s per annu for a yeerly sermon on Christmass day to be preached in the Colledge and the remainder to be disposed of monthly to such poor persons as the Provost and Senior Fellows shall think fitt
The Remainder of his estate he left to his daughter Elizabeth Provided she married no Irish man, or any related to that Interest, if she did or died without Issue, the whole Estate be settled on the Colledge of Dublin.
The Provosts or Presidents of Dublin COLLEDG.
The first was Adam Archbipp of Dublin.
2. Mr Walter Travers a Cantabrigian of Trinity Ao 1594.
3. Mr Henry Alvey of the same University and St Johns.
4. Mr William Temple afterwards Knighted and made one of the masters of the Chancery in Ireland, of Cambridge Kings Colledge, thence he was made choice of by Sr Philip Sidney, Knt to attend him in the United Netherlands during his Gouvernment there and at the instance of Dr Usher Lord Primate came to his Provostship Ano M D L XXXX in which he lived 17 years, and in the 72 yeer of his age died and is enterr'd under a fair Tombstone in the Colledge Chappel just before the Provosts Seate without Inscripcon
5 Mr Wm Bedel of the same University & Emanuel Coll presented to King Charles ye martyr by the famous Sr Henry Wotton as a fitt man for to be his Maties Provost of Dublin Colledge.
6 Doctor Robert Usher, who dying in England his monument and Inscripcon are seen at Pantabirsley in the county of Salop. which read page.
7. Mr William Chappell, Batchelour of Divinity, of Christs Colledge Cambridge afterwards Dean of Cassels he lieth buried in Bilthorp in Notinghamshire. whose Inscripcon read page.
8 Mr Richard Washington of University Colledge [p. 68] in Oxford sworne August 1640.
9 Dr Teate borne in Ireland brought up in the Colledge the author of a choice book called Right Thoughts the righteous mans Evidence
10 Doctor Anthony Martin a Cantabrigian of Emanuel colledge Bishop of Meathe he died of the Pestilence then rageing June 1650 and was then buried in Chappel of the Colledge but without Inscripcon.
11. Mr Samuell Winter came in in the yr 1649 by Act of Parliament and continued untill his Maties most happy Restauracon
12 Doctor Thomas Seele borne in Dublin city and educated in the Colledge a happy Restorer thereof, Dean of St Patricks and the first Provost after the Kings most happy returne, whose monument in black marble and Letters of Gold, against the wall is seen in the Colledge Chappell and whose inscripcon I have wrote off page.
13 Doctor Marsh of [blank space] in the University of Oxford
A late President of the Colledge of Physitians, was Doctor John Stearne whose monuments Inscription I transcrib’d page.
A Famous learned Vice-Provost Deane of Lismore and Chaplaine to his Grace the Duke of Ormond was ye late Dr Richard Lingard, whose most elegant inscripc upon his Tombestone I wrote out of the University Chappell page.
[p. 69, blank]
[p. 70]
M. S. S.
R. D. D. HENRICUS JONES. S. T. D., HUJUS ACADEMIAE
VICECANCELLARIUS, QUI PROPRIIS SUMPTIBUS HANC
BIBLIOTHECAM PULCHERRIMO GRADUUM APPARATU FENESTRIS
CLASSIBUS SUBSELLUS CAETERISQUE ORNAMENTIS INSTRUXIT AUXIT
COLLOCUPLETAVIT ANNO AERE CHRISTIANAE
MDCLI
[Arms]
This last Inscripcon is engraven on a brass plate over a door in the Old Quadrangle under marked with ye letter C.
[Arms]
Sr GEORGE CAREY OF COCKINGTON DEVON. KNIGHT, VICE-TREASURER AND TREASURER AT WARRES AND SOMETIMES LORD JUSTICE OF THE REALME OF IRELAND.
The last Inscripcon and armes are seen over the doors in the Walls of the first courte marked with the letters S. S.
M D C XXXIX.
D M S.
GEORGIUS BAKERIUS CANTABRIGIAE INCOLA DUBLINII
VIXIT HOSPES QUOQUE DIU MORITURUS UBI PRAETULIT ACADEMIA
UBI VIVET HOSPES EMINENS ET EXCIPIET TUOS APOLLO FILIOS CHARA
CAPITA AEDIBUS QUAS SUMPTU SUO PARAVIT SPLENDIDAS VIVET ET AMPLO
FRUETUR LAUDIS PRAEMIO ALII DUM SUA PERIERUNT PECUNIA QUA SATIS
MAGNUM HAUD PUTAT BAKERIUM MAJORE, MAGNUS ESTO BENEF1CENTIA
GUL CHAPEL CORC ET ROSS EPISCOPUS HUJUS COLLEGII PRAEPOSITUS.
This Inscripcon is in the new Buildings under the door undermarked thus * These Buildings are called Sr Jerome Alexanders Buildings
THE CHAPPEL door in the Old Quadrangle of curious artifice representing a Moses an Aaron the Armes of the twelve tribes, and at the Bottom a Pharo and his host drown'd, marked with ye letter T hath this Inscripcon [p.71] over it:
Sr WILLIAM FITZ WILLIAM KNIGHT SERVED HER MAJESTIE QUEEN
ELIZABETH IN THIS KEALME OF IRELAND 14 YEERS SINCE VIZ. TREASURER AND TREASURER AT WARRES AND FIVE TIMES LORD JUSTICE OF IRELAND.
With his Armes this motto Prohibere nefas and this date MDLXXXVIII he descended from the Fitz Williams of Sprots Bury Knts in Yorkshire.
[Arms]
Adjoining to the Library are seen the Armes of the Foundresse Q. Elizabeth after ye manner on ye right hand with this device at bottom
SEMPER EADEM. [pp. 64-71]
[Further inscriptions and comments on the University, pp. 71-75]
University of Dublin