St Johns Limerick

Artist(s) : Thomas Dineley (Draughtsman)

View of St John’s Church in Limerick. The façade culminates in a tripartite roof that covers the three naves. The main entrance to the building appears to be on the side. A belfry is visible at the back of the building. On the right-hand side of the image, near the entrance to the church, there is a large troop of soldiers with lances. The soldiers consist of a fragment of printed plate pasted upon the drawing, with traces of hand colouring. At the front of the scene there is a stone wall with a gateway. The drawing is surrounded by an oval frame.
Ferrar describes this church as having been repaired in 1763, at which time the above monument was apparently removed.
Sources:
John Ferrar, The history of Limerick, ecclesiastical, civil and military (Limerick: A. Watson & Co., 1787), p. 165.
Patrick Fitzgerald, The history, topography and antiquities of the county and city of Limerick, vol. 2 (Dubin: George McKern, 1827), p. 558.

Inscribed in Image

  • Caption within boundaries of image – St Johns Limerick

Image Details

Genre Landscape
Technique Collages, Engravings, Pen and ink drawings
Subject(s) Antiquities and archaeological sites, Architecture, Cities and towns
Geographical Location
  • St John's Church, Limerick - Named locality
  • Limerick - Town or city
  • Limerick - County
  • Munster - Province
Keywords(s) Archaeological sites, Buildings, Churches, Crowds, Flags, Gates, Men, People, Soldiers
Colour Handcoloured
Dimensions 7.9 cm x 6.2 cm
Published / created 1681

Bibliographical Details

Travel Account Observations in a Voyage through the Kingdom of Ireland
Contributor(s)
Print or manuscript Manuscript
Location of image in copy p. 132
Source copy National Library of Ireland MS 392
Permalink
Rights Courtesy of the National Library of Ireland

Related text from travel account

St Johns is the next Church to be visited consisting of 3 Isles, whose prospect I touched off page [blank space]. It hath little or nothing to recomend it to the sight of the curious onely this monument which see page [blank space] Its matter is of black marble, carrying this inscripcon in Roman Capitals
THOMAS POWER QUONDAM CIVES LIMERICENSIS ET EIUS UXOR JOVANNA RICE HOC MONUMENTUM HAEREDIBUS SUIS CONSTRUXERUNT IN QUO AMBO SEPELIUNTUR. ORET PRO EIS PIUS LECTOR.
QUISQUIS ERIS QUI TRANSIERIS, STA PERLEGE PLORA.
SUM QUOD ERIS FUERAMQUE QUOD ES PRO ME PRAECO ORA. HOC FINITO Ao DNI M.D.C.XXII.
[…] [p. 132]
St Johns having nothing in it worthy of note but one monument of Thomas Power I returne to the Cathedrall […]
[pp. 129, 132]
St Johns Limerick