[Sepulchral monument in Christ Church Cathedral, Dublin]

Artist(s) : Thomas Dineley (Draughtsman)

Pen and ink sketch of a sepulchral monument in Christ Church Cathedral, Dublin. It portrays a male figure with long hair, wearing a mitre and vestments, including a pallium, and bearing a pastoral staff, his right hand raised in blessing.

The person commemorated is taken to be Archbishop John de St Paul (d. 1362), known to have been buried in Christ Church under a marble stone with a brass figure, on the second step of the high altar. The identification of this sketch with that monument is made mainly on the basis of the text around the edge and a description by Ware in 1665. The incompleteness of the inscription transcribed by Dineley suggests that the brass was already damaged in 1681.

Sources:

Information communicated by Stuart Kinsella, Archivist, Christ Church Cathedral, Dublin, 22.10.2014.

Hugh Jackson Lawlor, ‘The monuments of the pre-Reformation Archbishops of Dublin’, The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, series 6, vol. VII, vol. XLVII, part 2 (31 Dec. 1917), pp. 109-138, here pp. 114-116.

Inscribed in Image

  • Text within boundaries of image – In carne mea videbo deum salvatorem meum / ... quondam Archiepiscopus Dublinie ...

Image Details

Genre Scientific or Technical illustration
Technique Pen and ink drawings
Subject(s) Antiquities and archaeological sites
Geographical Location
  • Christ Church Cathedral, Dublin - Named locality
  • Dublin - Town or city
  • Dublin - County
  • Leinster - Province
Keywords(s) Brass, Inscriptions, Men, People, Sculpture, Tombs & sepulchral monuments
Colour Monochrome
Dimensions 11.8 cm x 5.8 cm
Published / created 1681

Bibliographical Details

Travel Account Observations in a Voyage through the Kingdom of Ireland
Contributor(s)
Note
Print or manuscript Manuscript
Location of image in copy p. 34
Source copy National Library of Ireland MS 392
Permalink
Rights Courtesy of the National Library of Ireland
Sepulchral monument in Christ Church Cathedral, Dublin