[O’Sullivan’s Cascade, Killarney]

Artist(s) : Luttrell Wynne (Draughtsman)

View of the waterfall known as O’Sullivan’s Cascade, in a rocky tree-lined gorge. A man, with what appears to be a bugle or a firearm slung over his back, is seated by a rudimentary footbridge across the torrent.

Image Details

Genre Landscape
Subject(s) Nature
Geographical Location
  • Tomies Wood - Townland
  • Kerry - County
  • Munster - Province
  • O'Sullivan's Cascade - Named locality
Keywords(s) Bridges, Headgear, Hunting, Men, Rivers, Trees, Universities & colleges
Colour Coloured
Dimensions 31.5 cm x 21.5 cm
Published / created 1774

Bibliographical Details

Travel Account Journal and sketchbook, Ireland (1774)
Contributor(s)
Print or manuscript Manuscript
Location of image in copy PD/435 [image 12]
Source copy Formerly in Cornwall Record Office. PD/470-473, PD/435
Permalink
Rights Now in private collection. No reproduction authorized.

Related text from travel account

The Lake of Killarney is justly esteemed the chief curiosity of this and perhaps is not excelled by any thing in either of the three kingdoms. It is a singular instance of an objects more than answering to the warmest expectations that can be raised in its favour. For no traveller was ever known to leave this beautiful spot disappointed. If one of the finest expanses of water diversifyd in the most picturesque manner by Islands, rocks, woods dispersed about its surface and surrounded by the highest mountains clad with hanging wood there not of the common sort of this to the very summits in some places, & quite to the water edge in others can justify the unbounded admiration this uncommon spot meets with from all quarters it will be found with to deserve it all – Especially if to these circumstances we add a romantic old castle, once the seat of the great O’Donaghue, which is an ornament to every part of the Lower Lake particularly in a setting sun; & several waterfalls one which calld O’Sullivans has great beauty: it gushes through the bosom of a deep wood & after having descended with great noise & rapidity over several vast beds of rocks that interrupt its passage, pours itself into the Lake. There are several other falls of water within the recesses of the mountains but inferior to this. Ross Castle is now converted in barracks for the soldiers of which some are always in garrison here.
The morning after our arrival we got into an eight oared boat belonging to Ld Kenmair [Kenmare] & had every moment new opportunities of admiring this fine peice [sic]of water, which improved upon us at each stroke of the oar. [Unpaginated]
O’Sullivan’s Cascade, Killarney