Carlingford Harbour & Castle

Artist(s) : Theodore Henry Adolphus Fielding (Engraver)

View of ruined castle on rocky outcrop by water's edge. Sailng boats and a ship. A windy day.

Inscribed in Image

  • Signature – T. Fielding sc.
  • Caption outside of boundaries of image – Carlingford Harbour & Castle.

Image Details

Genre Landscape
Technique Aquatints
Subject(s) Forts and fortifications, Marines, Nature
Geographical Location
  • Carlingford Castle - Castle
  • Louth - County
  • Leinster - Province
Keywords(s) Bays (Bodies of water), Boats, Castles, Ruins, Seas, Ships
Colour Monochrome
Published / created 1818

Bibliographical Details

Travel Account The Scientific Tourist through Ireland
Contributor(s)
Print or manuscript Print
Location of image in copy 'Down'
Source copy James Hardiman Library, National University of Ireland, Galway Special Collections, 914.1504 WAL
Permalink
Rights James Hardiman Library, National University of Ireland, Galway

Related text from travel account

ROSTRETOR, about 22 m. from Downpatrick, is considered the Brighton of Ireland as a watering-place, and highly extolled for its romantic scenery; being seated on a well wooded bank on a small arm of the sea, which stretches into the country from Carlingford Bay. Sir R. C. Hoare describes the entrance to it as very striking on approaching from Dundrum; Carlingford Bay being so landlocked and surrounded by mountains as to resemble a large lake; and the tourist, passing through an irregular grove of tall and aged ash trees, with the sea and whitened houses glimmering between them, finds here a truly rural village retirement, commanding within its immediate vicinity more beauty than the generality of sea places; a dry soil, shady [next page] walks, diversified rides, and good bathing. He describes the most striking feature of this place to be a lofty mountain covered chiefly with oak wood, feathered down to the water's edge; underneath which is a little quay, from whence there is a walk of ¾ m. along the banks of the bay completely arboured by oaktrees, with a good road continued along the coast under the Mourne Mountains to Dundrum. Bay. We recommend this spot more particularly to the tourist, as Sir R. C. adds that he has seen no place with a more pleasing combination of rural beauties; mountains agreeably varied with wood, heath, and down, on one side; others on the opposite coast (Louth) singularly cultivated in small portions or strips resembling a quilt of patchwork; between them an extended channel of water, on the banks of which is the town of Carlingford with its ruined Abbeys and Castle; a purling brook, fine trees, neatly whitened cottages, &c. and a clean good inn. Miss Plumptre speaks of it in equally picturesque and admiring terms. 1 m. see ruins of Kilbreny Ch. The tourist may examine a romantic mountain road to Rathfyland; and the mineralogist will find ample amusement on the lofty mountains of Iveagh and Mourne, which extend far to the e. along the Irish sea. [‘Down’, unpaginated]

ROSTRETOR, about 22 m. from Downpatrick, is considered the Brighton of Ireland as a watering-place, and highly extolled for its romantic scenery; being seated on a well wooded bank on a small arm of the sea, which stretches into the country from Carlingford Bay. Sir R. C. Hoare describes the entrance to it as very striking on approaching from Dundrum; Carlingford Bay being so landlocked and surrounded by mountains as to resemble a large lake; and the tourist, passing through an irregular grove of tall and aged ash trees, with the sea and whitened houses glimmering between them, finds here a truly rural village retirement, commanding within its immediate vicinity more beauty than the generality of sea places; a dry soil, shady [next page] walks, diversified rides, and good bathing. He describes the most striking feature of this place to be a lofty mountain covered chiefly with oak wood, feathered down to the water's edge; underneath which is a little quay, from whence there is a walk of ¾ m. along the banks of the bay completely arboured by oaktrees, with a good road continued along the coast under the Mourne Mountains to Dundrum. Bay. We recommend this spot more particularly to the tourist, as Sir R. C. adds that he has seen no place with a more pleasing combination of rural beauties; mountains agreeably varied with wood, heath, and down, on one side; others on the opposite coast (Louth) singularly cultivated in small portions or strips resembling a quilt of patchwork; between them an extended channel of water, on the banks of which is the town of Carlingford with its ruined Abbeys and Castle; a purling brook, fine trees, neatly whitened cottages, &c. and a clean good inn. Miss Plumptre speaks of it in equally picturesque and admiring terms. 1 m. see ruins of Kilbreny Ch. The tourist may examine a romantic mountain road to Rathfyland; and the mineralogist will find ample amusement on the lofty mountains of Iveagh and Mourne, which extend far to the e. along the Irish sea. [‘Down’, unpaginated]

Carlingford Harbour & Castle